"Mindfulness as a Healing, Liberatory Practice in Queer, Anti-Oppression Pedagogy."

Social Alternatives, Special Issues Genders & Sexualities: Demilitarizing the Binary Beachhead.

Editor Dr. Jason A. Laker. 35:3 (2017). pgs 5-10.  


Keynote Speaker, University of Mary Washington Mindfulness Week

October, 2017

Keynote talk: How Mindfulness Can Help Us Be Better Agents of Social Change

Workshop: Mindfulness for Preventing Activist Burnout


Integrating Mindfulness into Anti-Oppression Pedagogy: Social Justice in Higher Education.

Routledge, October 2015.

Table of Contents:

  • Chapter One: Mindful Anti-Oppression Pedagogy
  • Chapter Two: Bringing the Body Back In
  • Chapter Three: Recognizing and Unlearning Internalized Oppression
  • Chapter Four: Dismantling Privilege with Mindful Listening
  • Chapter Five: Reframing Student Resistance as Mindful Dissonance
  • Chapter Six: Critiques and Challenges of Mindful Anti-Oppression Pedagogy
  • Chapter Seven: Building Empowered, Compassionate Communities

Yoga, the Body, and Embodied Social Change: An Intersectional Feminist Analysis

Edited by Beth Berila, Melanie Klein, and Chelsea Jackson Roberts

Contributors: ARIANE M. BALIZET; JACOBY BALLARD; DIANA YORK BLAINE; MARY BUNN; BETH S. CATLETT; KIMBERLY DARK; LAUREN ECKSTROM; JILLIAN FORD; THALIA GONZÁLEZ; MARCELLE M. HADDIX; CAROL HORTON; KERRIE KAUER; ROOPA KAUSHIK-BROWN; KARISHMA KRIPALANI; PUNAM MEHTA; STEFFANY MOONAZ; JENNIFER MUSIAL; WHITNEY MYERS; ENOCH H. PAGE; SARAH L. SCHRANK AND MARIA VELAZQUEZ

Yoga, the Body, and Embodied Social Change is the first collection to gather together prominent scholars on yoga and the body. Using an intersectional lens, the essays examine yoga in the United States as a complex cultural phenomenon that reveals racial, economic, gendered, and sexual politics of the body. From discussions of the stereotypical yoga body to analyses of pivotal court cases, Yoga, the Body, and Embodied Social Change examines the sociopolitical tensions of contemporary yoga. 

Because so many yogic spaces reflect the oppressive nature of many other public spheres, the essays in this collection also examine what needs to change in order for yoga to truly live up to its liberatory potential, from the blogosphere around Black women’s health to the creation of queer and trans yoga classes to the healing potential of yoga for people living with chronic illness or trauma. 

While many of these conversations are emerging in the broader public sphere, few have made their way into academic scholarship. This book changes all that. The essays in this anthology interrogate yoga as it is portrayed in the media, yoga spaces, and yoga as it is integrated in education, the law, and concepts of health to examine who is included and who is excluded from yoga in the West. The result is a thoughtful analysis of the possibilities and the limitations of yoga for feminist social transformation.


Contemplating the Effects of Oppression: Integrating Mindfulness into Diversity Classrooms.  

Published in the inaugural issue of The Journal of Contemplative Inquiry, vol 1, no. 1, 2014 by The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

This article argues that contemplative practices are particularly important additions
to university courses that deal with issues of oppression and diversity. Mindfulness can help students learn how their identity locations shape their reactions to course content; as such, they help participants do the work of unlearning the effects of systems of oppression. Students can then learn to recognize, understand, and be accountable for their responses. The article also argues that faculty who integrate contemplative practices in the classroom (in any discipline) need to be prepared for a myriad of responses from students, including reactions that result from being a member of marginalized groups
in society. Contemplative practices can unintentionally trigger disturbing responses for students, so the article concludes with useful principles rooted in feminist pedagogy to help faculty address those unexpected reactions.



The Danger of a Single Picture, Parts I and II

 

This 2-part blog post for the Yoga and Body Image Coalition addresses why our yoga media needs to be more diverse. I address the dancgers 


 
Photo credit Molly Hebzynski

Photo credit Molly Hebzynski